Supersonic live Q&As

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Supersonic live Q&As

We’re pleased to present two live Q&As with acclaimed artists at Supersonic this year. Following in the footsteps of Michael Rother (Neu!) and the Fear of Music panel at Supersonic 2010, Tony Conrad and William Bennett will be taking part in two separate Q&A sessions.

William Bennett will be discussing the influence of West African sounds on his own work, his new Afronoise project as Cut Hands and his music’s inclusion on the Vice film ‘The Vice Guide To Liberia’. Meanwhile, Tony Conrad will be in conversation at this year’s festival with the help of the ever inquisitive The Quietus, discussing his cross artform  approach, moving between the world of visual art, film and sound.

djcuthands.blogspot.com

tonyconrad.net

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Cut Hands

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In 2002, being inspired by Haitian vaudou musicians’ capacity to make intensely powerful music with almost no technology, William Bennett first employed djembes and doundouns on the classic Wriggle Like A Fucking Eel 12” by Whitehouse, in what was seen as a radical musical direction by many in the wider noise/industrial scene.
The Cut Hands project itself was founded by William Bennett in 2007 initially to experiment further with his obscure collection of Ghanaian percussion instruments in free-form work-outs alongside other types of (genuine) sound experimenting. The fruit of 8 years of recordings finally culminated in 2011’s critically acclaimed and best-selling release Afro Noise I.

The music of Cut Hands featured heavily in the VBS films Liberia (2009) and Mandingo (2010)

http://djcuthands.blogspot.com/

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VBS Guide To Liberia

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The Vice Guide To Liberia
Produced & Directed by Andy Capper and Shane Smith
Soundtrack by Cut Hands aka William Bennett of Whitehouse

In The Vice Guide To Liberia, VBS correspondents travel to the capital city Monrovia to meet three men who participated in the 14 years of civil war that ravaged the West African country.
These men are former warlords General Rambo, General Bin Laden and General Butt Naked, who freely admits to cannibalism and a body count of 20,000 during his time in the war. They  give us guided tours of some of the most dangerous, impoverished areas including jails, brothels, and heroin dens. Despite the UN’s intervention in the country, the majority of Liberia’s young people live in desperate poverty. Surrounded by filth, drug addiction, and teenage prostitution, the ex child soldiers who were forced into war struggle to fend for themselves by any means necessary. As the former President Charles Taylor fights accusations of mass war crimes in The Hague, the people strive for positive change against all odds. America’s one and only foray into African colonialism is keeping a very uneasy peace indeed.

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