Surgeon | Steve Davis & Kavus Torabi | DJ Bus Replacement Service

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HUGELY excited to announce another alt-club night in partnership with Hare & Hounds Kings Heath 10th anniversary series this November with DJ sets from: SURGEON, STEVE DAVIS & KAVUS TORABI, DJ BUS REPLACEMENT SERVICE
with visuals from EDWARDO TECH

Tickets will fly out for this 250 cap venue so ACT QUICK!

TICKETS HERE

 

***TELL US IF YOU’RE COMING ON THE FACEBOOK EVENT PAGE HERE***

Surgeon, real name Anthony Child, has been at the forefront of UK techno since 1994.
His debut “Surgeon EP” is regarded by many as seminal, and along with several early Downwards releases, caused a ripple of excitement through the techno cognoscenti of the time. Surgeon released a further three albums on Tresor, numerous Counterbalance and Dynamic Tension EPs and LPs “Body Request” in 2000, “Breaking The Frame” LP in 2011, and “From Farthest Known Objects” in 2016.
Over the course of his career, the Birmingham resident has perfected a unique and uncommonly effective production style. His is a tough techno sound with an industrial murk about it but also plenty of funk, swing and a sophisticated sense of dub-space learned in part from his Chain Reaction contemporaries in Berlin.
Nov 10th this local legend brings his notorious DJ set to The Hare venue 1 – NOT TO BE MISSED!
http://www.dj-surgeon.com/
https://soundcloud.com/dynamic-tension/surgeon-live-freerotation-7-7-17

RETURNING TO THE HARE after a killer show back in March this year is the one and only Steve Davis – this time with alt-music partner in tow – Kavus Torabi.
The legendary sporting phenomenon from the 80s who took snooker to new heights and as presenter of The Interesting Alternative Show on Pheonix FM with Kavus brought prog and jazz oddities to his cult audience, now turns his hands to the decks. As a hobby which he claims has spun out of control, their notorious 2016 Glastonbury set at the 500 capacity Stonebridge bar was mobbed by a curious turned shocked and enthralled crowd. With a packed out DJ diary since, the duo has continued to woo party goers from Bluedot to Bloc Festival. Drawing from an eclectic array of influences: Magma, Caravan, Oscar Perry, Soft Machine and Gong to name but a few – Steve & Kavus spin together a unique set in their quest to deliver the music they love to lovers of the party.
Listen back to The Interesting Alternative Show archive:
https://www.mixcloud.com/interestingalternative/

DJ Bus Replacement Service has been described by multi- disciplinary artist Russell Haswell as “evil” and “like a policewoman”.
Also known in Japan as DJ バスガス爆発 (BASU-GASU-bakahatsu).
https://soundcloud.com/deejaybrs

Promised to be a night of mind-bending music as these 4 alt-techno party lovers take turns on the decks, heightened by the flashes, projections & firworks of EDWARDOtme
https://www.facebook.com/edwardotme/?pnref=lhc

Tickets £12.50 advance
https://www.skiddle.com/whats-on/Birmingham/Hare-And-Hounds/Supersonic-Festival-x-Hare--Hounds-Surgeon-Steve-Davis–more/13050346/
£15 otd

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Raime: Re-establishing EDM

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‘Raime are past masters of sombre carnage, and this here is their moment.’THE QUIETUS

Raime are Joe Andrews and Tom Halstead, a London-based duo seeking to re-establish electronic composition as a physical and emotionally inquisitive force. Since the turn of the decade, via a stunning debut album, three sold-out EPs and a string of imperious live outings, Raime have honed an aesthetic all of their own.

According to Pitchfork, the music this London based duo creates is ‘the soundtrack to a lonely night out’. Since their debut with Quarter Turns Over A Living Line, Joe Andrews and Tom Halstead have become avid contributors to the growing popularity of bleak, minimalist electronic music.

Raime’s musical grounding lay in Detroit techno, jungle, and bass music but drawing from an eclectic array of influences, they leave the interpretation of their own concoctions to the rumination of the listeners. Why settle for EDM when you can channel 80s industrial and goth techno? 

“When you first listen to techno and you come across Detroit, the whole universe opens up”

Amid the dark, industrial post-rock influenced textures, unsettling beats pulsate like a throbbing headache in your temple. Conjuring up imagery of a barren dystopia, piercing dissonances interject the anxious layers of electronica and moody guitar lines.

“It was great to find this area of music that was even more bonkers [than techno], but that came from people like us – from some dude in Norwich banging something.”

Read about Raime’s quest for RAWNESS with The Guardian [here]

Raime’s second album, Tooth, arrived in June 2016. The widescreen melancholia of their 2012 debut, Quarter Turns Over A Living Line, has given way to an urgent and focussed futurism, in the shape of eight fiercely uptempo, minimal, meticulously crafted electro-acoustic rhythm tracks. The DNA of dub-techno, garage/grime and post-hardcore rock music spliced into sleek and predatory new forms.

‘It’s a spare, near-monochromatic palette, well fit for its immediate purpose. The result is an album that takes its lead from bands like This Heat and Ike Yard but boils their urgency down to a throbbing core of contemporary dread, all the propulsive rhythms tied up in knots.’ RESIDENT ADVISOR

If Quarter Turns was an album that confronted total loss and self-destruction, even longed for it, then Tooth is the sound of resistance and counter-attack: cunning, quick, resolute; calling upon stealth as much as brute-force. It is bold and original new music: staunch, rude, and way out in front.

Raime recently returned with a new 12″ single for Blackest Ever Black in the last week of February this year, featuring two new tracks, recorded after last year’s Tooth album…and it sold out fast. But a new batch is ready which you can purchase [here]

Sneak peak here:

“Dance music has always been the backbone of our influences so propulsion comes pretty naturally, but we really started getting into bands a lot more over the last seven years or so and experienced what they can offer dynamically. We thought it might create more immediacy and ultimately move our sound on. We realised that we wanted to change the way we were saying things, lay a few old tropes to rest and try something new, ultimately learning how to make records according to different rules.”

With this in mind, we can’t wait to see what Raime will do for their live set. What physical force will they assemble to express their punishing rumble of gothic dub to our Supersonic audience? You’ll just have to wait and see!

GRAB YOUR TICKETS NOW!

More from Raime [here]

 

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Graham Dunning: Mechanical Techno Set

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“IT’S LIKE A BADLY-OILED MACHINE, A MACHINE THAT IS ALMOST FALLING TO PIECES.”Graham Dunning

On March 4th in association with Hare & Hounds 10th anniversary series we bring you the ultimate alternative DJ night. With headliner Steve Davis, snooker champion turned Alt-DJ cult hero paired with live visuals from HelloCatFood and support from Graham Dunning with his Mechanical Techno Set, we’ve no doubt this avant-garde-discotheque will exercise your body and your brain.

Graham Dunning works with sound, processes and found objects visually drawing upon dirt, dust and decay, evoking notions of memory, collecting and archiving. Dunning’s work sonically remixes cultural off-cuts, often utilising the unwarranted noise inherent in vinyl and cassette playback.

A self-taught artist and musician, his work explores sound as texture, timbre and tactility, drawing on bedroom production, tinkering and recycling found objects.

Dunning’s background in experimental music informs his approach into whatever audio, visual, physical piece of art he is creating; experimentation and play being a main part of the process.

“My work explores time and commemoration: How people store their memories, in personal archives – photographs, audio journals, post-it notes – and what becomes of those archives. I find discarded objects interesting in themselves, for the stories that they suggest or that can be read into them. Collecting things has always held a fascination for me, both to do myself and to look at the way others do it.”

This enthusiasm in ‘the way others do it’ is probably what makes this artist such an avid collaborator. From musicians, to producers, to multi-disciplsinerary art groups such as A.A.S – Dunning, in his art-form fluidity, has created a patchwork quilt-esque archive: offering something for all kinds of art-appreciators.

Flick through his website [here]

Recently Dunning’s performance project Mechanical Techno – a teetering stack of collaged vinyl interspersed with physical interventions and extended phonograph needles – has drawn accolades from sound art and music festival scenes.

The installation of the Mechanical Techno set is an incredible thing to watch come to life; Graham is gradually joined on stage by some abstract lo-fi R2D2 sound machine, fully responsive but slightly out of whack, with it’s own chaotic wit. 

Dunning speaks fondly of Lee ‘Scratch’ Perry, who referred to dub as “the ghost in me coming out” and with his own brand of techno he certainly unleashes a whole new entity into the a-typical DJ night.

For an in depth interview with Graham from ATTN Magazine click [here]

This is set to be an unmissable, mind bending night of dance. For more info. click on the Facebook event page [here].

[TICKETS ON SALE HERE]

AND DON’T MISS OUR EXCLUSIVE OFFER OF 4 FOR £40Limited online only so get in quick!

 

 

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Steve Davis: Cued Up

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(photo credit: Matt Bohill)

“Steve Davis makes the point that if anyone ever tried to push him off balance, he would waver not to the left, right or backwards, but only forwards.”

Steve Davis on snooker stance

With Kavus Torabi, DJ Bus Replacement Service and techno legend Surgeon in tow, Steve returns to The Hare and Hounds, Kings Heath for ROUND 3 of the ultimate alternative club night – yes 3, it’s THAT good! Act fast, tickets sold out way in advance last time – facebook event page HERE

Steve Davis – the legendary sporting phenomenon from the 80s who took snooker to new heights and as presenter of The Interesting Alternative Show on Phoenix FM brought prog and jazz oddities to his cult audience, now turns his hands to the decks. A real game changer: a real forward thinker.

Listen back to the archive of The Interesting Alternative Show:

We at Supersonic began to wonder about the science, the physics behind being both snooker champion and superstar DJ.

An insightful article on snooker technique at http://www.fcsnooker.co.uk/ assists with this comparison:

“Players should not be bound by principles generally laid down in previous books. If need be, they should experiment and find out if they can achieve their objectives in other ways.”

“What suits one player will not automatically suit another”.

“Discover the stance that works best for you and do not copy others. Try and focus on what is happening on top of the table and not what is happening beneath.”

From snooker, to turn, the table is a place Steve Davis is well on top of. He is certainly not bound by previously laid principles and experiments with an atypical approach to bringing the party.

It’s a hobby which he claims has spun out of control. His notorious 2016 Glastonbury set at the 500 capacity Stonebridge bar with partner in crime Kavus Torabi was mobbed by a curious turned shocked and enthralled crowd. With a packed out DJ diary since, Steve and Kavus have continued to woo party goers from Bluedot to Bloc Festival, from all around the UK to Thailand and beyond. Drawing from an eclectic array of influences: Magma, Caravan, Oscar Perry, Soft Machine and Gong to name but a few – Steve & Kavus spin together a unique set in their quest to deliver the music they love to lovers of the party.

For an article on the 10 records that changed Steve’s life, click [here]

According to http://snookerdelight.com, here are the steps towards taking the perfect snooker shot:

[DJ edit]

(we’re really enjoying this metaphor)

Step 1: Determine where you want the cue ball to go

Step 2: Determine where the cue ball will strike the object ball audience

Step 3: Determine how to strike the cue ball – pace and position 

Step 4: Stand behind the intended line of the cue ball (NOTE: this is where a lot of amateur players get into trouble) (NOTE: remain behind the booth. OR stand on it if you’re Kavus Torabi)

Step 5: Walk into the shot in a specific consistent way finger point dance

Step 6: Feather and pause as needed [errr?]

Step 7: Strike the cue ball [DROP]

OK I think we’ve laboured the point long enough. This is going to be a championship worthy set!

TICKETS!

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